Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Dali on display in Paris

Salvador Dali surrealist painting "The Persistance of memory" has melting clocks in various arrangementsSalvador Dalis art including his most famous surrealist piece "The Persistence of memory" showcasing melting clocks is currently on display in a large exhibit in Paris starting November 21st. The four-month show brings together more than 200 paintings, sculptures, along with drawings, writings and television clips from the 1920s to the 1980s. The Pompidou Centre modern art museum last did an exhibit of Dali's work in 1979 and it turned out to the biggest triumph in the museum’s history, attracting 840,000 visitors.

Salvador Dali was an eccentric Spanish painter that understood how the media worked and used it to its full potential. Dali was a prolific artist, creating more than 1500 paintings during his life time and many works in other mediums, including prints, drawings, sculpture, book illustration, and theater set designs. During his lifetime the public got a picture of a bizarre paranoid. His personality caused a lot of controversy. The most famous work of Salvador Dali is "The Persistence Of Memory"(shown here), which introduced the surrealistic image of the soft, melting pocket watch, The general interpretation of the work is that the soft watches debunk the assumption that time is rigid or deterministic, and this sense is supported by other images in the work, such as the wide expanding landscape and the ants and fly devouring the other watches.

 Besides creating a number of great paintings, Dali caused the attention of the media by playing the role of a surrealist clown. Salvador Dali made a lot of money and was contemptuously nicknamed Avida Dollars (greedy for dollars) by Andre Breton. Dali became the darling of the American High Society. Celebrities like Jack Warner or Helena Rubinstein gave him commissions for portraits. Salvador Dali's art works became a popular trademark and besides painting he pursued other activities, including jewelry and clothing designs for Coco Chanel, and film making with Alfred Hitchcock.

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